Publications

Books:

Mindfulness and Madness: Money, Food, Sex and the Sacred

Attachment-1

Articles:

Meditation as the Art of Everyday Life

We entered the world with a sense of the miraculous and with openness to raw experience.  By the time we left childhood, we were taught to suppress the ordinary miracle of being. The problem is that the world is no longer enchanted for us as when we were children and ordinary things pulsated with life.  Read More . . .

Spiritual Sobriety

We’re larger than our experience of suffering at any moment. Buddhism suggests that we are the space of awareness within which suffering is occurring and that our true dimensions extend beyond it.  Read More . . .

Living in the Moment

Throughout the day there are continual moments of openness and possibility, but also uncertainty.  For the meditator, the challenge is whether we are able to linger in the space of  ‘don’t know’ and trust what happens next…You could discover that you feel like crying with joy, or maybe hugging a tree, or biting into a Macintosh apple, and surprise yourself. Read more..

Samsara: The Difference Between Dogs and Lions

When you’re with a dog and you throw a stick, the dog will faithfully chase the stick. When you throw a stick before a lion, the lion will chase you not the stick. . . . Like dogs we have been faithfully chasing all the stuff that the mind throws at us.  We need to look at the “thrower” of the sticks rather than the mind’s productions.  Read more

Tender Courage

Mindfulness meditation suggests that it is refreshing to meet the nakedness of situations with your own nakedness, here and now.  Outside of the immediacy of nowness we fail to genuinely appreciate our lives because we are struggling to survive in time,  projecting ourselves into the future or attempting to resolve the past.  Read more

Shining a Light in the Darkness

There is a dark side of the mind that many spiritual practitioners unwittingly avoid… Meditation or prayer doesn’t always shine a light into those areas because our “shadows” are heavily defended. Meditation may reveal the transparency of our ego, who we take ourselves to be, but that is only half the story. Read More

Cultural Factors Shaping Buddha’s Message

Every culture through which Buddhism radiated its wisdom shaped the Buddha’s message to the mentality of its populace, and by doing so, offered novel and fresh opportunities for Buddha dharma to shine through. In the present cross fertilization of East and West, something very unique in the history of spirituality is being born. Read More

(click on title or “read more” links to be taken to the article)

Karma: Entrapment or Liberation

The Buddha taught that our thoughts manifest as words, and they in turn, manifest as behaviors, which develop into habits, and habits eventually harden into character or personality. We might add that character is destiny in that the compelling power of our habitual patterns shape our lives in conformity with who we take ourselves to be. Read More:

Even Yogis Get the Blues

Extending loving kindness to ourselves creates a fierce fire. As we open to our shadow aspects, the broken, wounded and inferior parts, we may experience shame and feel diminished. Yet, it is precisely these forgotten aspects of ourselves that cry out for our love so that we can be healed and whole. Read More: